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A MATCHLESS LIBRARY TELEVISION ARCHIVE                  
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#10768: 1940 IN REVIEW
1940-12-00, , min.
Unknown

A look at the year 1940.             
#11334: "TELEVISION EXPERIMENT: ABSENT FOR ONE"
1946-07-22, WOR, 23 min.
Unknown

Studio rehearsal of a murder mystery with camera angles and shots discussed by the narrator. No open or close.

"Absent For One" Rehearsal recording-23 minutes. Planned television production on WRGB, Schenectady, NY, July 22nd, 1946.
Actors dialog, and camera movements. 
#10769: 1946 IN REVIEW
1946-12-00, , min.
Unknown

A review of the year 1946.            
#5897*: PULITZER PRIZE PLAYHOUSE: KNICKERBOCKER HOLIDAY
1950-11-17, WABC, 54 min.
N/A

October 6, 1950-June 29, 1951. January 2, 1952-June 4, 1952. An hour-long dramatic anthology series, adapting Pulitzer Prize-winning stories. SEARCH PROGRAM TITLE FOR COMPLETE DETAILS.
#10767: 1950 IN REVIEW
1950-12-00, CBC, min.
Unknown

The year 1950 in review.            
#19064: DIMENSION X
1951-09-29, NBC, min.
Arch Oboler

April 8th, 1950- September 29th, 1951

Dimension X was an NBC radio program broadcast mostly on an unsponsored, sustaining basis from April 8th, 1950- September 29th, 1951. The first thirteen episodes were broadcast live, and the remainder were prerecorded. 

Guest: Arch Oboler of "Lights Out." Five minute interview.                 
#10766: 1951 IN REVIEW
1951-12-00, , min.
Unknown

A look at the year 1951.            
#10770: 1951 IN REVIEW
1951-12-00, CBC, min.
Unknown

A review of the year 1951.           
#10765: 1953 IN REVIEW
1953-12-00, , min.
Unknown

A look at the year 1953.              
#6956: ACADEMY AWARDS: 27TH ANNUAL
1955-03-30, NBC, 79 min.
Jerry Lewis , Claire Trevor , Danny Thomas , Jane Wyman , Bob Hope , Tom Tully , Dean Martin , Karl Malden , Rod Steiger , Grace Kelly , Marlon Brando , Conrad Nagel , Humphrey Bogart , William Holden , Jan Sterling

The third televised Academy Awards with M.C's Bob Hope in Hollywood and Thelma Ritter and Conrad Nagel in New York.
                                                    
#10352: "MISS AMERICA 1956"
1955-09-10, CBS, min.
John Daly , Bert Parks , Bess Meyerson , Lee Ann Meriwether

Miss America for 1956 is crowned. Sharon Richie, Miss Colorado, wins the top prize. 

Co-hosts are Bert Parks, John Daly, Bess Meyerson, and Lee Meriwether, (Miss America 1955). 
#13030: HUNTER, THE
1956-00-00, WCBS, 9 min.
Barry Nelson

July 3rd, 1952-September 24th, 1952- (CBS)
September 26th,1954-December 26th, 1954 (NBC)

A half-hour cold war spy series. Barry Nelson starred as Bart Adams, American undercover agent in the CBS version and Keith Larsen played the role in the NBC version two years later. The series was directed by Oscar Rudolph who directed some episodes of The Lone Ranger. 

In this episode, The Hunter clashes with a modern Nazi Superman.                                                                         
#10532: MGM PARADE
1956-01-12, ABC, 36 min.
George Murphy

September 14th, 1955- May 2nd 1956 (ABC )

George Murphy hosted this half-hour series that presented clips from vintage films, biographies of stars, and previews of upcoming motion pictures. Murphy was lated replaced by Walter Pigeon as host.     

Five different episodes: January 12th, Febuary 8th, Febuary 15th, Febuary 22nd, and Febuary 29th, 1956. 36 minutes.    

Review of the film "Powers Girl."                         
#13020: BANDWAGON 1956
1956-10-28, WCBS, 7 min.
Will Rogers Jr.

Campaign songs of the past, narrated by Will Rogers, Jr.                      
#10435: "WIZARD OF OZ, THE"
1956-11-03, CBS, min.
Judy Garland , Bert Lahr , Liza Minnelli , Ray Bolger , Jack Haley , Frank Morgan , Modest Mussorgsky

The first television showing of The Wizard Of Oz. Introduction by Bert Lahr and Liza Minnelli. The TV debut on CBS on November 3rd, 1956, attracted 35 million viewers. 

The conclusion of The Wizard Of Oz. Includes the CBS signoff. 

Also included from May 2nd, 1955, The Bell Telephone Hour. A radio version of "Night On Bald Mountain," a serious of compositions by Modest Mussorgsky in D Minor. 
#10434: "WIZARD OF OZ, THE"
1956-11-03, CBS, min.
Judy Garland , Bert Lahr , Liza Minnelli , Ray Bolger , Jack Haley , Frank Morgan

The first television showing of The Wizard Of Oz. Introduction by Bert Lahr and Liza Minnelli. The TV debut on CBS on November 3rd, 1956, attracted 35 million viewers. 
#13085: RECOLLECTIONS AT 30: NBC RADIO
1956-11-07, WNBC, 13 min.
Kate Smith , Ed Herlihy , Tallulah Bankhead , Milton Cross , George M. Cohan , Madame Ernestine Schumann-Heink , Frank Murray

A recollection of old NBC radio broadcasts hosted by Ed Herlihy. 
Excerpts include a reading by Tallulah Bankhead who hosted NBC radio's weekly variety series, "The Big Show," George M. Cohan sings "Over There," from 1937, the bugler who sounded the ceasefire on November 11th, 1918, ending World War 1. Also featuring Milton Cross, Kate Smith, Madame Ernestine Schumann-Heink, and Frank Murray.                                   
#13082: PIELS BEER COMMERCIAL
1956-11-07, , 1 min.
Bob Elliott , Ray Goulding

A Piels Beer commercial is heard starring Bert and Harry Piels.
The voices of Bob Elliott and Ray Goulding.                      
#13101: DANGER WITH GRANGER
1956-11-24, , 2 min.
Steve Granger

July 23rd, 1956-February 25th, 1957
 
A half-hour radio drama created by the Mutual Broadcasting Company based on the dramatic files of New York City private detective Steve Granger. 

The opening excerpt is heard.                       
#13102A: MILLION DOLLAR MOVIE, THE
1956-11-27, WOR, 01 min.
Announcer , Frank McCarthy , Ted Mallie

September 21, 1954-April 20, 1968

WOR TV Channel 9 in New York premiered the concept of the "MILLION DOLLAR MOVIE" with the Debut of MAGIC TOWN (1947), on September 21, 1954 to fill time slots when the telecasting of the Brooklyn Dodger baseball season ended.

THE MILLION DOLLAR MOVIE was a new concept in television viewing...a highlight attraction seen each day locally in New York City on WOR-TV Channel 9. Each week starting on Monday, a TV Debut movie would be shown, Monday thru Friday, twice each evening, 7:30pm & 10:00pm (TEN weekday SHOWINGS). The same film would then be broadcast multiple times on Saturday, 3:00pm, 5:00pm, 7:30pm, and 10:30pm and continuous showings on Sunday, at 12:00pm, 5:00pm, 7:30pm, and 10:00pm. 

That totaled  EIGHTEEN TELECASTS OF THE SAME FILM, BROADCAST EACH WEEK.

 The final across the board multiple showings of a single film for this series was DANGEROUS GROUND (1952), final telecast Friday, August 20, 1965. From that time on the moniker of THE MILLION DOLLAR MOVIE continued to be used but for the next three years films were sporadically shown more than once in different time slots, or were shown only one time, mainly on weekends. 

The title THE MILLION DOLLAR MOVIE was dropped completely  after the showing of the documentary, KON-TIKI (1951) which aired on WOR TV Saturday April 20, 1968.  Thereafter when WOR TV aired movies they were introduced with a generic opening. 

During the almost 14 year rein of THE MILLION DOLLAR MOVIE the opening musical number "Tara's Theme" by Max Steiner would be played as the opening introduction to the movie followed by a voice over announcing the name of the movie and actors.

In booth announcer for THE MILLION DOLLAR MOVIE form its premiere in 1954 thru 1959 was Frank McCarthy. Subsequently, following the end of WOR's affiliation with Mutual in 1959, Ted Mallie became the announcer. 

For the week of Monday thru Sunday, November 26-December 2, The NY TV Debut of the film EXPERIMENT PERILOUS (1944), starring Hedy Lamarr, was broadcast on THE MILLION DOLLAR MOVIE a total of EIGHTEEN TIMES. 

The entire opening of THE MILLION DOLLAR MOVIE broadcast November 27, 1956 is heard. It is the oldest air check known to exist related to the opening of THE MILLION DOLLAR MOVIE. 
                                                                                                                                                        
#13112: PIELS BEER COMMERCIAL
1956-12-02, , 1 min.
Bob Elliott , Ray Goulding

A Piels Beer commercial with Bert and Harry Piels.                       
#13113: LATE SHOW, THE
1956-12-02, WCBS, 1 min.
Announcer

February 26, 1951-April 26, 1968

"The Late Show" which for years would be New York's top feature film show, premiered on WCBS TV New York on Feb. 26, 1951 "The Late Late Show" followed not long after, as did "The Early Show." As its run accumulated, WCBS would commemorate its  anniversary the week of Feb. 26 in different ways. On Feb. 26, 1963, for example, Ch. 2 celebrated "The Late Show's 4,327th broadcast...12th anniversary by inaugurating an extended broadcast day that ended after 5 A.M., unprecedented for its time.

The standard opening of "The Late Show" had the announcer state the title of the film, its cast and some additional relevant anecdotal piece of information related to the film. The musical opening was "The Syncopated Clock," written by Leroy Anderson and recorded by Percy Faith in 1951 (released by Columbia Records). The catchy melody was noticed by the producers of the new WCBS-TV program "The Late Show," that was to be the station's first venture into late night television. Faith's rendition was chosen as the theme music for The Late Show by WCBS and several other CBS owned-and-operated stations around the country, which helped Anderson's composition become a tune that many Americans could readily hum or whistle, even if few knew the name of its composer. WCBS would also use the Faith recording to introduce a weekday afternoon movie (The Early Show) and a later-night movie offering, The Late Late Show.

In 2006 a shortened version of The Syncopated Clock theme music would become the standard opening of the Archival Television Audio, Inc. archived collection...musical intro preceding a specific mastered TV Audio Air Check, which had been processed and mastered from the original off the air recording.  


The last time the moniker "The Late Show" was broadcast on WCBS television, in New York, was April 26, 1968 (WOLF LARSEN (1958). The series lasted 17 years and two months, totaling 6,189 Movie broadcasts. Films still ran in the 11:30pm time slot afterwards, but without the "Late Show" opening. During the years to follow, thru the 1970's, other facsimile Late Show openings were created, a secondary version of the original series. 

"The Syncopated Clock" instrumental standard opening is heard. The announcer introduces "On Borrowed Time"
starring Lionel Barrymore. New York television debut.                                                                           
#13122C: BERT AND HARRY PIELS COMMERCIAL
1956-12-26, , 1 min.
Bob and Ray , Bob Elliott , Ray Goulding

Commercial for Piels Beer with Bert and Harry Piels.                                                   
#13124: FLEETWOOD RADIO SHOW WITH HARRY FLEETWOOD
1956-12-28, WNBC, 1 min.
Harry Fleetwood

Harry Fleetwood was a nighttime radio disc jockey who played classical music on WNBC radio in New York City.                                                 
#13134: LATE SHOW, THE
1957-01-05, WCBS, 1 min.
Announcer , Spencer Tracy

February 26, 1951-April 26, 1968

"The Late Show" premiered on WCBS TV New York on Feb. 26, 1951 "The Late Late Show" followed not long after, as did "The Early Show." As its run accumulated, WCBS would commemorate its  anniversary the week of Feb. 26 in different ways. On Feb. 26, 1963, for example, Ch. 2 celebrated "The Late Show's 4,327th broadcast...12th anniversary by inaugurating an extended broadcast day that ended after 5 A.M.

The last time the moniker "The Late Show" was broadcast on WCBS television it was April 26, 1968 (WOLF LARSEN (1958). The series lasted 17 years and two months, totaling 6,189 Movie broadcasts. Films still ran in the 11:30 pm time slot afterward but without the "Late Show" opening. 

The Late Show opening prior to telecasting the movie " Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo," (1944) starring Spencer Tracy.                                                                    


February 26, 1951-April 26, 1968

"The Late Show" which for years would be New York's top feature film show, premiered on WCBS TV New York on Feb. 26, 1951 "The Late Late Show" followed not long after, as did "The Early Show." As its run accumulated, WCBS would commemorate its  anniversary the week of Feb. 26 in different ways. On Feb. 26, 1963, for example, Ch. 2 celebrated "The Late Show's 4,327th broadcast...12th anniversary by inaugurating an extended broadcast day that ended after 5 A.M., unprecedented for its time.

The standard opening of "The Late Show" had the announcer state the title of the film, its cast and some additional relevant anecdotal piece of information related to the film. The musical opening was "The Syncopated Clock," written by Leroy Anderson and recorded by Percy Faith in 1951 (released by Columbia Records). The catchy melody was noticed by the producers of the new WCBS-TV program "The Late Show," that was to be the station's first venture into late night television. Faith's rendition was chosen as the theme music for The Late Show by WCBS and several other CBS owned-and-operated stations around the country, which helped Anderson's composition become a tune that many Americans could readily hum or whistle, even if few knew the name of its composer. WCBS would also use the Faith recording to introduce a weekday afternoon movie (The Early Show) and a later-night movie offering, The Late Late Show.

In 2006 a shortened version of The Syncopated Clock theme music would become the standard opening of the Archival Television Audio, Inc. archived collection...musical intro preceding a specific mastered TV Audio Air Check, which had been processed and mastered from the original off the air recording.  


The last time the moniker "The Late Show" was broadcast on WCBS television, in New York, was April 26, 1968 (WOLF LARSEN (1958). The series lasted 17 years and two months, totaling 6,189 Movie broadcasts. Films still ran in the 11:30pm time slot afterwards, but without the "Late Show" opening. During the years to follow, thru the 1970's, other facsimile Late Show openings were created, a secondary version of the original series. 

"The Syncopated Clock" instrumental standard opening is heard. The announcer introduces "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo."                                                                                                  
#13133: PIELS BEER COMMERCIAL
1957-01-05, , 1 min.
Bob Elliott , Ray Goulding

A Piels Beer commercial with Bert and Harry Piels                        
#13153A: GUNSMOKE
1957-04-06, CBS, min.
James Arness

September 10th, 1955-September 1st, 1975.

Television's longest-running western starring James Arness as Marshall Matt Dillon.        
#11390: THIS IS THE ANSWER
1957-09-01, SYN, min.
Cast Unknown

1956-1961- SYNDICATED 

Religious program produced by the Southern Baptist Convention.

This episode entitled: " Formula For Failure."

A quiet, honest man finds himself outsmarted by a fast-talking business associate. 

SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957.

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the potential capacity to record 64 minutes).

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before.

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact.

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page.

GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats.

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device.

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side.

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.
#11392: LAMP UNTO MY FEET
1957-09-01, CBS, 30 min.
Bert Freed , Reed Morgan , Jean Cooke , Iggie Wolfington , Lyman Bryson , Howard Rodman , Porter Routh

November 21st, 1948- January 21st, 1979 (CBS)

Sunday morning religious program. One of television's longest-running network shows which featured programs on cultural as well as religious themes. 

This episode entitled: "Return To The Prodigal," by Howard Rodman, concerns a man who hopes his son will go into the ministry, although the son's leanings are toward mechanics. Today's guest is Porter Routh of The Southern Baptist Convention. Dr. Lyman Bryson is moderator. 

Cast:

Father- Bert Freed
Wes- Reed Morgan
Florence- Jean Cooke 
The Whittler- Iggie Wolfington 

SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957.

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the potential capacity to record 64 minutes).

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before.

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact.

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page.

GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats.

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device.

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side.

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.
#11391: LOOK UP AND LIVE
1957-09-01, KNXT, 30 min.
Rev. Lawrence McMaster

January 3rd, 1954- January 21st, 1979, (CBS)

Long-running Sunday morning religious program.

During the show's early years, the Reverend Lawrence McMaster frequently appeared while long-time talk-show host Merv Griffin hosted the show for a brief period in 1955.

This episode is a presentation of the film, "The Man Who Called,"
which is devoted to the work of church laymen and the many services rendered to a parish by the members of it's churches.  

SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957.

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the potential capacity to record 64 minutes).

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before.

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact.

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page.

GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats.

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device.

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side.

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.

#11414: VERDICT IS YOURS, THE
1957-09-02, KNXT, 30 min.
Jim McKay , David Ensor , Robert Rietty

September 2, 1957 - September 28, 1962
CBS Television Network - LIVE -

PREMIERE BROADCAST:

This popular courtroom drama began as a daytime show. It aired five days a week. Each show ran for half an hour. The Verdict is Yours  also enjoyed a prime-time run on CBS during the summer of 1958. 

Simulated court trials were depicted and presided over by actual judges, and with practicing attorneys representing the litigants in each case.

The programs were unrehearsed, and the testimonies of witnesses and the arguments by counsel were extemporaneous. Litigants and witnesses were portrayed by professional actors. The Jury selected from the studio audience would hear the testimony and render a verdict. There was not a predetermined length for the trials, and each broadcast would continue for as many days as was required to complete the proceedings and render a verdict. 

Jim McKay was seen each day as a CBS reporter assigned to cover the courtroom activity. McKay would sometimes narrate events leading up to the trial, and his role would be integrated into the action.

Today's premiere broadcast is "the Matter of George and Nora Myers."

After caring for a six-year-old boy for several years, the Myers family fights to regain custody of the child after he is taken away by his biological mother. 

SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957.

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the potential capacity to record 64 minutes).

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before.

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occurred beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact.

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page.

GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, Sound Scriber and Voice Writer formats.

Audograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device.

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side.

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976. 
#11408: LOVE OF LIFE
1957-09-02, CBS, 15 min.
John Hess , Paul Raven

September 24th, 1951-February 1st, 1980 (CBS) 

Love Of Life was a CBS daytime drama set in the town of Barrowsville. It premiered as a fifteen-minute show and on April 14th, 1958 was expanded to thirty minutes. In 1962 it was trimmed to a twenty-five-minute format. Over the years, the fictional town was changed to Rosehill. 
The show was originally created by John Hess. 

On this episode: Paul Raven's plans are almost discovered. 


SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957.

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the potential capacity to record 64 minutes).

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before.

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact.

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page.

GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats.

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device.

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side.

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.

                                                 
#11409: SEARCH FOR TOMORROW
1957-09-02, CBS, 15 min.
Mary Stuart , John Aniston

September 3rd, 1951-March 26th, 1982 (CBS)
March 29th, 1982- December 26th, 1986 (NBC)

Created by Roy Windsor, this durable daytime drama enjoyed a thirty-five year run on both CBS and finishing  on NBC,
Search For Tomorrow was sent in the town of Henderson and its main character was Joanne Gardner Barron Tate Vincente Tourneur
played by Mary Stuart for the show's entire run.  


    SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957.

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the potential capacity to record 64 minutes).

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before.

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact.

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page.

GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats.

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device.

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side.

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.                                                                        
#11415: BRIGHTER DAY, THE
1957-09-02, KNXT, 15 min.
Blair Davies , Leonard Blair

January 4th, 1954-September 28th, 1962 (CBS)

Daytime soap opera created by Irna Phillips. The Brighter Day began on radio in 1948 and came to television in January 1954.
From 1954-1956 the radio broadcast was an audio repeat of the day's television episode. The story centered around the Dennis family who lived in the town of New Hope. On June 18th, 1962, the show expanded from fifteen minutes to twenty-five minutes and was moved from a late afternoon time slot to late morning. Notable celebrities such as Hal Holbrook, Lois Nettleton, and Patty Duke were featured on the program. Televised from New York City until 1961, it moved to Hollywood the same year.
The show was produced by Leonard Blair.  

  
SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957.

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the potential capacity to record 64 minutes).

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before.

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact.

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page.

GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats.

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device.

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side.

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.                                    
#11421: STUDIO ONE
1957-09-02, KNXT, 60 min.
Addison Powell , House Jameson , Charles Korvin , Joanne Linville , David Lewis , Roland Winters

November 7th, 1948- September 29th, 1958- (CBS)

Studio One was one of the oldest and most highly acclaimed of the several dramatic anthology series that comprised television's "Golden Age." The hour-long series was produced by Worthington Miner from 1948-1952 and later produced by Herbert Brodkin. Many directors worked on the show at one time or another, including Yul Brynner, Sidney Lumet, and Robert Mulligan. Broadcast live from New York City until January,1958, production shifted to the West Coast where the show was retitled, "Studio One In Hollywood." The show left the air a few months later. 

This Episode: Charles Korvin stars in tonight's mystery presentation "The Dark Intruder," written by Alfred Brenner. Newspaper music critic Philip Hausman has been mysteriously assaulted. He suspects a plot instigated by a newly acclaimed composer, William Lovell. Hausman has been violently attacking Lovell's music through his column, though no one has ever met or seen Lovell. 

Cast: 
Philip Hausman: Charles Korvin
Kathy: Joanne Linville
Edmund Taylor: David Lewis
Charles Brooks: Roland Winters
Moore: House Jameson
Dr. Frank: Addison Powell 

SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957. 

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the  potential capacity to record 64 minutes). 

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before. 

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occurred beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact. 

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.   

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page. 

                 GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, Sound Scriber and Voice Writer formats. 

Audograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device. 

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The 
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side. 

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE  GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976. 
#11412: AS THE WORLD TURNS
1957-09-02, CBS, 30 min.
Irna Phillips , Helen Wagner

April 2nd, 1956- September 17th, 2010 (CBS)

One of television's first thirty-minute serials, which premiered on the same day as another CBS serial, "The Edge Of Night." Created by Irna Phillips, also the creator of "The Guiding Light" and "The Brighter Day." It was set in the Midwestern town of Oakdale. 


SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957. 

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the  potential capacity to record 64 minutes). 

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before. 

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact. 

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.   

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page. 

                 GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats. 

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device. 

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The 
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side. 

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE  GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.  
#11417: EDGE OF NIGHT, THE
1957-09-02, KNXT, 30 min.
Ann Flood

April 2nd, 1956-November 28th1975 (CBS)
December 1st, 1975- December 28th, 1984 (ABC)

On April 2nd, 1956, CBS introduced The "Edge Of Night" and "As The World Turns" as television's first thirty-minute daytime drama serials. Created by Irving Vendig, the show, which was set in the town of Monticello, at first emphasized crime stories and courtroom drama. In later years, more emphasis was placed on romantic themes, common to most soap operas. From 1962-1984, one of the main characters on the show was Nancy Pollock, played by Ann Flood. 
On December 1st, 1975, the show moved to ABC television, becoming the first daytime serial to shift networks. It finished its run on ABC on December 28th, 1984 with the final episode.

Episode of September 2nd, 1957. 

SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957. 

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the  potential capacity to record 64 minutes). 

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before. 

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact. 

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.   

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page. 

                 GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats. 

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device. 

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The 
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side. 

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE  GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.
 

                
#11416: SECRET STORM, THE
1957-09-02, KNXT, 15 min.
Cec Linder , James Vickery

February 1st, 1954- February 8th, 1974 (CBS)

Created by Roy Winsor, The Secret Storm was a daytime drama seen on CBS. It began as a fifteen-minute program and in June 1962, expanded to thirty minutes. The story centered on the comings and goings of the Ames family of Woodbridge until the late 1960s when the show was sold by American Home Products to CBS. For many years, the show was produced by Gloria Monty who was best-known for many years as the producer of "General Hospital." 

This episode is from September 2nd, 1957.  


SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957.

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the potential capacity to record 64 minutes).

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before.

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occurred beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact.

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page.

GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats.

Audograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device.

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side.

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.  
#11407: HOTEL COSMOPOLITAN
1957-09-02, CBS, 15 min.
Donald Woods

August 19th, 1957- April 11th, 1958. (CBS) 

Fifteen-minute daytime soap opera, replacing "Valiant Lady." Set in the Cosmopolitan Hotel in New York City, it presented episodic, rather than continuing dramas. Donald Woods, (appearing as himself) hosted the series.


SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957.

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the potential capacity to record 64 minutes).

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before.

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact.

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page.

GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats.

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device.

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side.

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.
#11429: AS THE WORLD TURNS
1957-09-03, KNXT, 30 min.
Irna Phillips , Helen Wagner

April 2nd, 1956- September 17th, 2010 (CBS)

One of television's first thirty-minute serials, which premiered on the same day as another CBS serial, "The Edge Of Night." Created by Irna Phillips, also the creator of "The Guiding Light" and "The Brighter Day." It was set in the Midwestern town of Oakdale. 


SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957. 

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the  potential capacity to record 64 minutes). 

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before. 

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact. 

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.   

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page. 

                 GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats. 

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device. 

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The 
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side. 

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE  GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.  
#11426: SEARCH FOR TOMORROW
1957-09-03, KNXT, 15 min.
Mary Stuart , John Aniston

September 3rd, 1951-March 26th, 1982 (CBS)
March 29th, 1982- December 26th, 1986 (NBC)

Created by Roy Windsor, this durable daytime drama enjoyed a thirty-five year run on both CBS and finishing  on NBC,
Search For Tomorrow was sent in the town of Henderson and its main character was Joanne Gardner Barron Tate Vincente Tourneur
played by Mary Stuart for the show's entire run.  

SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957. 

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the  potential capacity to record 64 minutes). 

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before. 

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occurred beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact. 

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.   

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page. 

                 GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, Sound Scriber and Voice Writer formats. 

Audograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device. 

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The 
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side. 

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE  GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976. 
    SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957.

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the potential capacity to record 64 minutes).

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before.

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact.

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page.

GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats.

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device.

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side.

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.                                                                        
#11435: EDGE OF NIGHT, THE
1957-09-03, KNXT, 30 min.
Ann Flood

April 2nd, 1956-November 28th1975 (CBS)
December 1st, 1975- December 28th, 1984 (ABC)

On April 2nd, 1956, CBS introduced The "Edge Of Night" and "As The World Turns" as television's first thirty-minute daytime drama serials. Created by Irving Vendig, the show, which was set in the town of Monticello, at first emphasized crime stories and courtroom drama. In later years, more emphasis was placed on romantic themes, common to most soap operas. From 1962-1984, one of the main characters on the show was Nancy Pollock, played by Ann Flood. 
On December 1st, 1975, the show moved to ABC television, becoming the first daytime serial to shift networks. It finished its run on ABC on December 28th, 1984 with the final episode.

Episode of September 3rd, 1957. 

 
SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957. 

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the  potential capacity to record 64 minutes). 

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before. 

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occurred beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact. 

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.   

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page. 

                 GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, Sound Scriber and Voice Writer formats. 

Audograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device. 

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The 
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side. 

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE  GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976. 
                  
#11432: VERDICT IS YOURS, THE
1957-09-03, KNXT, 30 min.
Jim McKay , David Ensor , Robert Rietty

September 2, 1957 - September 28, 1962
CBS Television Network - LIVE -

This popular courtroom drama began as a daytime show. It aired five days a week. Each show ran for half an hour. The Verdict is Yours  also enjoyed a prime-time run on CBS during the summer of 1958. 

Simulated court trials were depicted and presided over by actual judges, and with practicing attorneys representing the litigants in each case.

The programs were unrehearsed, and the testimonies of witnesses and the arguments by counsel were extemporaneous. Litigants and witnesses were portrayed by professional actors. The Jury selected from the studio audience would hear the testimony and render a verdict. There was not a predetermined length for the trials, and each broadcast would continue for as many days as was required to complete the proceedings and render a verdict. 

Jim McKay was seen each day as a CBS reporter assigned to cover the courtroom activity. McKay would sometimes narrate events leading up to the trial, and his role would be integrated into the action.


NOTE: For most of the series judge David Ensor presided and attorney Robert Rietty presided. 


SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957.

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the potential capacity to record 64 minutes).

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before.

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact.

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page.

GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats.

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device.

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side.

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.

#11433: BRIGHTER DAY, THE
1957-09-03, KNXT, 15 min.
Blair Davies , Leonard Blair

January 4th, 1954-September 28th, 1962 (CBS)

Daytime soap opera created by Irna Phillips. The Brighter Day began on radio in 1948 and came to television in January 1954.
From 1954-1956 the radio broadcast was an audio repeat of the day's television episode. The story centered around the Dennis family who lived in the town of New Hope. On June 18th, 1962, the show expanded from fifteen minutes to twenty-five minutes and was moved from a late afternoon time slot to late morning. Notable celebrities such as Hal Holbrook, Lois Nettleton, and Patty Duke were featured on the program. Televised from New York City until 1961, it moved to Hollywood the same year.
The show was produced by Leonard Blair. 

   SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957. 

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the  potential capacity to record 64 minutes). 

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before. 

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occurred beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact. 

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.   

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page. 

                 GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, Sound Scriber and Voice Writer formats. 

Audograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device. 

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The 
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side. 

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE  GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.                                     
#11422: FARM REPORT, THE
1957-09-03, KNXT, 10 min.
Announcer unknown

Ten-minute report on the latest farm news. 

SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957. 

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the  potential capacity to record 64 minutes). 

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before. 

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occurred beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact. 

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.   

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page. 

                 GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, Sound Scriber and Voice Writer formats. 

Audograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device. 

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The 
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side. 

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE  GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976. 
#11427: GUIDING LIGHT, THE
1957-09-03, KNXT, 15 min.
Pamela King , Phil Sterling

June 30th, 1952- September 18th, 2009 (CBS)  

Set in the town of Springfield, the story centers on the Bauer family. The show was created by Irna Phillips.  
The drama had been on both radio and television for a period of 72 years starting on NBC radio in 1937.

 SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957. 

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the  potential capacity to record 64 minutes). 

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before. 

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occurred beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact. 

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.   

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page. 

                 GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, Sound Scriber and Voice Writer formats. 

Audograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device. 

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The 
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side. 

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE  GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.                        
#11443: SPOTLIGHT PLAYHOUSE
1957-09-03, KNXT, 30 min.
Phyllis Kirk , Everett Sloane , Osa Massen , Richard Webb , Francis DeSales

Drama anthology series.

Phyllis Kirk and Everett Sloane in "Exclusive." Sarah Caine, a successful newspaperwoman, refuses to marry because of her career. In Paris on an assignment, she learns that her father, also a journalist, is there also on a story. Raised by her mother to hate her father, she decides to try and scoop him. (Film).

Cast:
Sarah Caine: Phyllis Kirk
Paul Caine: Everett Sloane
Elena: Osa Massen
Sam Fletcher: Richard Webb
Cass Ryan: Francis DeSales 

SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957. 

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the  potential capacity to record 64 minutes). 

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before. 

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occurred beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact. 

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.   

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page. 

                 GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, Sound Scriber and Voice Writer formats. 

Audograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device. 

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The 
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side. 

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE  GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976. 
#11425: LOVE OF LIFE
1957-09-03, KNXT, 15 min.
John Hess , Paul Raven

September 24th, 1951-February 1st, 1980 (CBS) 

Love Of Life was a CBS daytime drama set in the town of Barrowsville. It premiered as a fifteen-minute show and on April 14th, 1958 was expanded to thirty minutes. In 1962 it was trimmed to a twenty-five-minute format. Over the years, the fictional town was changed to Rosehill. 
The show was originally created by John Hess. 

On this episode: Paul Raven's plans are almost discovered. 


SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957.

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the potential capacity to record 64 minutes).

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before.

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact.

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page.

GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats.

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device.

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side.

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.

                                                 
#11434: SECRET STORM, THE
1957-09-03, KNXT, 15 min.
Cec Linder , James Vickery

February 1st, 1954- February 8th, 1974 (CBS)

Created by Roy Winsor, The Secret Storm was a daytime drama seen on CBS. It began as a fifteen-minute program and in June 1962, expanded to thirty minutes. The story centered on the comings and goings of the Ames family of Woodbridge until the late 1960s when the show was sold by American Home Products to CBS. For many years, the show was produced by Gloria Monty who was best-known for many years as the producer of "General Hospital." 

This episode is from September 3rd, 1957. 


 SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957. 

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the  potential capacity to record 64 minutes). 

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before. 

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occurred beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact. 

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.   

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page. 

                 GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, Sound Scriber and Voice Writer formats. 

Audograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device. 

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The 
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side. 

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE  GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.   
#11424: HOTEL COSMOPOLITAN
1957-09-03, KNXT, 15 min.
Donald Woods

August 19th, 1957- April 11th, 1958. (CBS) 

Fifteen-minute daytime soap opera, replacing "Valiant Lady." Set in the Cosmopolitan Hotel in New York City, it presented episodic, rather than continuing dramas. Donald Woods, (appearing as himself) hosted the series.


SELECTIONS FROM ORIGINAL GRAY AUDOGRAPH DISC RECORDINGS, RECORDED OFF THE AIR, REPRESENTING SEVEN CONSECUTIVE DAYS OF KNXT LOS, ANGELES BROADCASTING, SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 1 THRU 7, 1957.

These LOST CBS broadcasts represent an unprecedented one complete week, sign on to sign off, September 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 1957 (130 hours on 130 8 & 1/2" diameter discs with a capacity to record 32 minutes per side (side one and side two had the potential capacity to record 64 minutes).

These discs were obtained in Los Angeles by Phil Gries, creator and owner of Archival Television Audio, Inc. in 2011. They were originally found in an establishment, located in Burbank, California, selling old records dispersing its inventory as they went out of business, a few years before.

The rarity of this type of media to record television is not known to have occured beyond a few incidents, as stated below, at any other time, which make this collection of TV Audio Airchecks, recorded on Gray Audograph discs, an amazing surviving artifact.

The sound quality varies with different broadcasts. After a period of almost three years, processing and digitizing these 130 two sided discs, there is recognition of the rarity of some of these broadcasts providing one of a kind surviving Television Audio Airchecks and are extremely desirable regardless of some of the extraneous sound artifacts heard on some of these tracks which were painstakingly processed and transferred one by one to optimize the sound quality and proper pitch.

NOTE:

To listen to a seminar Phil Gries presented at an ARSC presentation in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, in 2014, about these Gray Audograph Discs...their genesis, discovery and contents, go to the ATA website www.atvaudio.com and click on ARSC which can be found within the right column on the ATA Home Page.

GRAY AUDIOGRAPH (1946 - 1976)

History:

The Gray Audograph was a dictation disc recording format introduced in 1946 by the Gray Manufacturing Company in the United States. It recorded sound by pressing grooves into soft vinyl discs, like the competing, but incompatible, SoundScriber and VoiceWriter formats.

Audiograph discs were blue thin plastic flexible discs, recorded from the inside to the outside, the opposite of conventional phonograph discs. Another difference compared to phonograph discs (78, 45, 33 & 1/2) was that the audiograph was driven by a surface-mounted wheel, meaning that its recording and playback speed decreased toward the edge of the disc (like the Compact Disc and other digital formats), to keep a more constant linear velocity and to improve playing time.

The mandatory speed variation correction requires playback on an Audograph player, which ATA possesses and has modified, allowing line out output connections, direct line, to the input of any other recording format device.

Gray Audograph discs were available in three different sizes. The 6-inch diameter disc offered 10 minutes of recording time per side, the 6 & 1/2" disc offered 15 minutes per side. The
8 & 1/2" disc, which is extant in the ATA archive, offered 30 minutes of recording per side.

ALONG WITH THE DICTABELT RECORDER, A GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER MACHINE CAPTURED THE ACTUAL LIVE SOUNDS RECORDED OF GUN SHOTS AT THE TIME OF THE JOHN F. KENNEDY ASSASSINATION. THESE AUDIO SOUNDS WERE USED IN THE REVIEW BY THE UNITED STATES HOUSE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ASSASSINATIONS.

THE GRAY COMPANY CEASED MANUFACTURE OF THE GRAY AUDOGRAPH RECORDER IN 1976.
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