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A MATCHLESS LIBRARY TELEVISION ARCHIVE                  


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#13105: WALTER WINCHELL SHOW, THE
1956-11-30, NBC, 7 min.
Jimmy Durante, Billy Gilbert, Robert Merrill, Shelley Winters, Walter Winchell, Jules Buffano, Gypsy Rose Lee

October 5, 1956-December 28, 1956

Walter Winchell attempted to bring to television a shortened  variety show version of The Ed Sullivan Show. His half hour format was brief, and after 13 weeks his series was cancelled. 

Walter Winchell's guests are Shelley Winters and Jimmy Durante.
Jimmy sings, "Toscannin, Iturbi & Me." 
Billy Glibert takes a bow from the audience, celebrating his 50th anniversary in show business.                                                     
#13106: HEAVYWEIGHT BOXING CHAMPIONSHIP: ARCHIE MOORE VS. FLOYD PATTERSON
1956-11-30, , 15 min.
Archie Moore, Floyd Patterson, Don Dunphy, Billy Gilbert, Robert Merrill, Winn Elliott, Jimmy Powers, Gypsy Rose Lee

The 1956 heavyweight boxing championship fight between Floyd Patterson and Archie Moore. Don Dunphy gives the blow-by-blow report of rounds 1 and 5 with commentary by Jimmy Powers. Patterson knocks out Moore in round 5. Patterson and Moore are interviewed after the fight with commentary by Winn Elliott.                                                   
#13107: TEX AND JINX SHOW, THE
1956-11-30, WRCA, 3 min.
Jinx Falkenburg, Tex McCrary

Hosts Tex McCrary and his wife Jinx Falkenburg reminisce about Pearl Harbor Day, December 7th, 1941.                                       
#13108: JACKIE GLEASON SHOW, THE
1956-11-30, WCBS, 5 min.
Jackie Gleason, Tommy Dorsey

September 20, 1952-June 22, 1957; October 3, 1958-January 2 1959; February 3 1961-March 24, 1961; September 1962-September 12, 1970

After the 1954-1955 season (one hour live broadcasts), Jackie Gleason produced a series of 39 filmed half-hour episodes of "The Honeymooners" which was syndicated (1955-1956). For the following 1956-1957 season, the Jackie Gleason Show returned to a live one-hour variety format with a Honeymooners sketch included in many of its broadcasts. After this season, The Honeymooners sketches would not be revived until the 1966-1967 season of The Jackie Gleason Show.    

A tribute to bandleader Tommy Dorsey.                                                                           
#13109: CAESAR'S HOUR, STARRING SID CAESAR
1956-11-30, WNBC, 6 min.
Sid Caesar, Carl Reiner, Nanette Fabray, Howard Morris, Janet Blair

September 27th, 1954-May 25th, 1957

A sixty-minute comedy show starring Sid Caesar. Most of Sid's old gang of regulars from "Your Show Of Shows" returned. They included Nanette Fabray, Janet Blair, Carl Reiner, Howard Morris, and Pat Carroll.

This episode includes a spoof of the game show, "What's My Line?"                                                                               
#13110: ED SULLIVAN SHOW (TOAST OF THE TOWN)
1956-12-02, CBS, 19 min.
Debbie Reynolds, Eddie Fisher, Ed Sullivan, Sophie Tucker, Tony Curtis, Doris Day, Janet Leigh, Myron Cohen, Louella Parsons

           June 20, 1948 - May 30, 1971

ED SULLIVAN SHOW, THE, (TOAST OF THE TOWN)
Television's longest running variety series. Originally, titled, TOAST OF THE TOWN, the name of the series changed on September 18, 1955 to THE ED SULLIVAN SHOW. Most remembered for introducing many stand-up comedians, and musical acts, including The Rolling Stones, Elvis Presley, The Beatles. 

 Most of the 1,087 broadcasts, encompassing 10,000 performers, have been archived. The major exceptions are the first half year of shows circa 1948 of which a few kinescope excerpts survive.
 
The ED SULLIVAN SHOW was a spectacular show-case that for twenty-three years entertained the American family. In its prime, more than thirty million viewers, young and old, tuned in at the same time to view popular culture.   

Guests include Sophie Tucker, Myron Cohen, Luella Parsons who presents the 1956 Modern Screen Award to Janet Leigh, Eddie Fisher, Debbie Reynolds, Tony Curtis, and Doris Day.                                    
#13111: HY GARDNER CALLING
1956-12-02, WRCA, 6 min.
Jimmy Durante, Hy Gardner, Salvatore Dali

HY GARDNER CALLING - Sunday Night, half hour broadcasts, weekly, WRCA Ch. 4 New York City -11:15pm - 11:45pm, 11:30pm - 12:00am  April 29, 1956-January 13, 1957

HY GARDNER - Mon-Fri, weekdays, WRCA CH. 4 New York City 11:15-11:25pm, 11:20-11:30pm, 11:15-11:30pm September 10, 1956-January 25, 1957

January 28, 1957 - ? Hy Gardner ten minute segments "Face to Face" on TONIGHT! (New format replacing Steve Allen)
revised format series hosted by Jack Lescoulie. 

HY GARDNER SHOW - October 25, 1959-August 14, 1960 WNEW 45 minute and 60 minute broadcasts, Sunday evenings 10-11pm.

HY GARDNER SHOW - September 24, 1960 - September 29, 1962 WOR one hour weekly broadcasts, Saturday evenings 12am-1am.

HY GARDNER SHOW - October 21, 1962 - April 4, 1964 WOR one hour weekly broadcasts Saturdays or Sundays 7:00pm-8:00pm.

HY GARDNER SHOW - September 26, 1964-January 10, 1965 WOR one hour weekly broadcasts Saturday 11:30pm-12:30am or 12:00am-1:00am.


Hy Gardner was a well-known New York Herald-Tribune columnist.  He  appeared regularly on Tonight! and America After Dark, a short-term substitute for Tonight! after Steve Allen abandoned it early in 1957. Gardner specialized in profiling show business celebrities and other news makers, and he hosted a nightly ten-minute TV interview program in New York called Face to Face. His weekly Sunday-night show, Hy Gardner Calling!, also aired only in the New York area and consisted of interviews conducted by telephone, with the subject seemingly at home, but actually seated in one studio, while Gardner sat at his desk in another. The telephone hook-up was real, and there was no physical proximity between host and guest. The show premiered in 1954 ? on New York City’s NBC affiliate station WRCA-TV, Channel 4, and ran until 1965. 

Hy Gardner interviews Jimmy Durante who recalls his early days in show business, Salvatore Dali explains his new technique using bullets.                                                                                                    
#13112: PIELS BEER COMMERCIAL
1956-12-02, , 1 min.
Bob Elliott, Ray Goulding

A Piels Beer commercial with Bert and Harry Piels.                       
#13113: LATE SHOW, THE
1956-12-02, WCBS, 1 min.
Announcer

February 26, 1951-April 26, 1968

"The Late Show" which for years would be New York's top feature film show, premiered on WCBS TV New York on Feb. 26, 1951 "The Late Late Show" followed not long after, as did "The Early Show." As its run accumulated, WCBS would commemorate its  anniversary the week of Feb. 26 in different ways. On Feb. 26, 1963, for example, Ch. 2 celebrated "The Late Show's 4,327th broadcast...12th anniversary by inaugurating an extended broadcast day that ended after 5 A.M., unprecedented for its time.

The standard opening of "The Late Show" had the announcer state the title of the film, its cast and some additional relevant anecdotal piece of information related to the film. The musical opening was "The Syncopated Clock," written by Leroy Anderson and recorded by Percy Faith in 1951 (released by Columbia Records). The catchy melody was noticed by the producers of the new WCBS-TV program "The Late Show," that was to be the station's first venture into late night television. Faith's rendition was chosen as the theme music for The Late Show by WCBS and several other CBS owned-and-operated stations around the country, which helped Anderson's composition become a tune that many Americans could readily hum or whistle, even if few knew the name of its composer. WCBS would also use the Faith recording to introduce a weekday afternoon movie (The Early Show) and a later-night movie offering, The Late Late Show.

In 2006 a shortened version of The Syncopated Clock theme music would become the standard opening of the Archival Television Audio, Inc. archived collection...musical intro preceding a specific mastered TV Audio Air Check, which had been processed and mastered from the original off the air recording.  


The last time the moniker "The Late Show" was broadcast on WCBS television, in New York, was April 26, 1968 (WOLF LARSEN (1958). The series lasted 17 years and two months, totaling 6,189 Movie broadcasts. Films still ran in the 11:30pm time slot afterwards, but without the "Late Show" opening. During the years to follow, thru the 1970's, other facsimile Late Show openings were created, a secondary version of the original series. 

"The Syncopated Clock" instrumental standard opening is heard. The announcer introduces "On Borrowed Time"
starring Lionel Barrymore. New York television debut.                                                                           
#13114: WALTER WINCHELL SHOW, THE
1956-12-09, Mutual, 12 min.
Walter Winchell

September 18, 1955-March 3, 1957

Walter Winchell in Hollywood. Miscellaneous radio news gossip with Walter Winchell reporting in Hollywood, airing 6:00-6:15pm. 

NOTE: Walter Winchell had been on the radio since December 4, 1932.                                                               
#13116: IT'S POLKA TIME
1956-12-11, ABC, 2 min.
Stan Wolowic, Bruno Zielinski

July 13th, 1956-September 24th, 1957

Polka Music broadcast live from Chicago, performed by Polish-Americans. It was hosted by Bruno "Junior" Zielinski and featured the Stan Wolowic band.                                                                             
#13115: VICTOR BORGE SHOW, THE
1956-12-11, , 15 min.
Liberace, Victor Borge

February 3rd, 1951-June 39th, 1951-

A half-hour comedy/variety series starring Victor Borge. 
Borge imitates Liberace. He performs his famous "Punctuation Skit."                                                              
#13117: CBS NEWS WITH RON COCHRAN, THE
1956-12-12, WCBS, 3 min.
Bob and Ray, Ron Cochran, Richard Nixon, Bob Elliott, Ray Goulding

The UN condemns Russia on Hungary, the Security Council votes to admit Japan to UN General Assembly, sporadic fighting in Budapest, Hungarian refugees brought to the USA, 9500 Hungarians to come to the United States, Vice-President Nixon to fly to Austria to seek aid for Hungarian refugees. 
Includes opening Piels Beer Commercial.                                     
#13118: NIGHT BEAT WITH MIKE WALLACE
1956-12-12, WABD, 22 min.
Mike Wallace, H.V. Kaltenborn

October 9, 1956-May 31 1957

Night beat was an hour-long talk/interview program hosted by Mike Wallace and broadcast on WABD-TV channel 5 in New York City. (Dumont). It was broadcast from 11 PM to 12 AM Tuesday through Friday evenings. Wallace served as host from October 1956 to May 1957. 

Mike Wallace interviews journalist H.V. Kaltenborn, joined in progress.

NOTE: Phil Gries in conversation with Mike Wallace donated this "lost" much often sought after broadcast to Wallace. He had little recall related to what was talked about or subject matter, and was astonished when listening to the air check.                                                                                    
#GR4: MATINEE THEATER: "CAPTAIN BRASSBOUND'S CONVERSION"
1956-12-13, WNBC, min.
John Conte, Val Dufour, Phil Gries, Gary Rutkowski, Norman Alden, Robert Burton, Patricia Cutts, Terence de Marney, Bryan Grant, Lumsden Hare, Edmund Hashim, Peter Mamakos, Justice Watson

    October 31, 1955 - June 13, 1958


Captain Brassbound, a vindictive sea captain, swears revenge on a visiting Englishman whom he blames for his mother's death.

This peerless COMPLETE AUDIO AIR CHECK broadcast  of "CAPTAIN BRASSBOUND'S CONVERSION" was restored by Phil Gries from an original 1/4" reel to reel audio tape discovered and obtained by archivist scholar Gary Rutkowski (www.savetv.tv).

Matinee Theater  was an American anthology series that aired on NBC during the Golden Age of Television, from October 31, 1955,[ to June 27, 1958 (including last two weeks of re-runs).
 
The series was broadcast on NBC television daily from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Eastern Time, was usually broadcast LIVE and most of the time in color. Its live dramas were presented with minimal sets and costumes. During its three-year series run there were 7000 different performers employed, and hundreds of talented writers and directors who navigated its peerless television run, using 4,200 sets, 210,000 props, and 15,000 costumes.
 
Host for this series was John Conti.

When it was broadcast, Matinee Theater was the most heavily promoted regularly scheduled daytime program on U.S. television, part of the network's effort to "provide quality 'adult' entertainment" in daytime programming. 
 
The series ended in 1958 due to its high budget, much higher than any other daytime program in television. A few of the later episodes were preserved on color film for later rerun syndication under different titles.

Almost all of the 590 original and 81 re-run episodes broadcast have been wiped, destroyed, or are not known to exist any longer in any broadcast form (audio or kinescope, or video).

UCLA Film & TV has 20 different kinescopes in their archive, most not accessible. 

The Library of Congress has only TWO kinescopes in their archive, each on separate negative audio tracks, and separate 16mm Negative Kinescopes. However in 1986 when NBC TV donated 18,600 of their extant kinescopes (1948-1975) to the LOC, their was notated at that time SEVEN separate kinescopes (separate 16mm films and corresponding Negative Optical Sound tracks), for the broadcast dates, Oct. 31, 1955, Nov. 28, 1955, Nov. 29, 1955, Dec. 20, 1955, April 20, 1956, May 3, 1956 & Dec. 10, 1956. 

The Paley Center for Media has THREE composite kinescopes in their archive. 

*The following FOUR television audio air checks are extant in the Archival Television Audio, Inc. collection, archived on ¼” reel to reel audio tape originally used to record these programs off the air, direct line, resulting in excellent playback sound, at the time of their original broadcast. 

*All FOUR titles extant in the ATA archive are not included in the above three major USA media archives.

6 Nov. 1956
ATA#GR1 The Tell-Tale Heart – November 6, 1956

In this classic Edgar Allan Poe story, a man commits a murder, but afterward the victim's beating heart torments the murderer's mind.


5 Feb. 1957
ATA#GR2 Frankenstein – February 5, 1957 

An obsessed scientist assembles a living being from parts of exhumed corpses.


15 Feb. 1957
ATA#GR3 The Others – February 15, 1957
 7.8 (21)
 
A governess battles to save two children from an evil supernatural force.

13 Dec. 1956
ATA#GR4 Captain Brassbound's Conversion – December 13, 1957

Captain Brassbound, a vindictive sea captain, swears revenge on a visiting Englishman whom he blames for his mother's death.

*The scripts of the MATINEE THEATER series' later episodes are archived at the University of California, Los Angeles.
                                                                                                                 
#13119: WALTER WINCHELL RADIO SHOW, THE
1956-12-16, , 8 min.
Phil Rizzuto, Walter Winchell

Walter Winchell news and commentary. 

Winchell mentions that former Yankee Phil Rizzuto has been signed by the Yankee organization to do play by play announcing of New York Yankee games beginning in April of 1957.                                     
#13120: TEX AND JINX RADIO SHOW, THE
1956-12-18, WRCA, 40 min.
Jackie Robinson, Nelson Rockefeller, Marilyn Monroe, Elia Kazan, Jinx Falkenburg, Marian Anderson, Sol Hurok, Tex McCrary, Nelson Rockerfeller

Broadcast from 10:00pm to Midnight. Jackie Robinson is interviewed by Tex McCrary. Jackie discusses Branch Rickey

The guests are Jackie Robinson, Elia Kazan, and Marilyn Monroe.
Tex talks to Jackie about his recent trade, five days before on December 13th, from the Brooklyn Dodgers to the New York Giants for pitcher Dick Littlefield, and $30,000. Robinson refused to report to the Giants forcing cancellation of the deal and his subsequent announcement of his retirement the following month. Robinson discusses the Dodgers acquisition of pitcher Sal "The Barber" Maglie who helped the team to win their final pennant in Brooklyn. 
Movie director Elia Kazan comments on the C-rating his latest movie "Baby Doll" received from the Catholic Church, Marilyn Monroe comments favorably on the film released on the day of this broadcast, New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller comments on the Urban League community, Marian Anderson and Sol Hurok are the recipients of the 1956 Urban League awards. 

NOTE: Jackie Robinson would later say that he didn't spurn the New York Giants, but had planned to retire because of declining health, and a desire to pursue business opportunities. Robinson retired with a career .311 batting average, 947 runs scored and 197 stolen bases, the most notable his steal of home in game one of the 1955 World Series.                                                                                                                   
#13121: TEX AND JINX RADIO SHOW, THE
1956-12-18, WRCA, 40 min.
Jackie Robinson, Nelson Rockefeller, Marilyn Monroe, Elia Kazan, Jinx Falkenburg, Marian Anderson, Sol Hurok, Tex McCrary, Nelson Rockerfeller

Broadcast from 10:00pm to Midnight. Jackie Robinson is interviewed by Tex McCrary. Jackie discusses Branch Rickey

The guests are Jackie Robinson, Elia Kazan, and Marilyn Monroe.
Tex talks to Jackie about his recent trade from the Brooklyn Dodgers to the New York Giants and discusses the Dodgers acquisition of pitcher Sal "The Barber" Maglie who helped the team to win their final pennant in Brooklyn. Movie director Elia Kazan comments on the C-rating his latest movie "Baby Doll" received from the Catholic Church, Marilyn Monroe comments favorably on the film released on the day of this broadcast, New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller comments on the Urban League community, Marian Anderson and Sol Hurok are the recipients of the 1956 Urban League awards.

NOTE: The Brooklyn Dodgers traded Jackie Robinson to rival New York Giants on Thursday, December 13, 1956, five days before this broadcast aired. At the time Jackie Robinson was 37 years old. He was traded for Giant pitcher Dick Littlefield and $30,000. ROBINSON REFUSED to report to the Giants, forcing a cancellation of the deal. Robinson would later say that he didin't spurn the Giants, but had planned to retire because of declining health and a desire to pursue business opportunities.

Breaking the major league league baseball's color barrier when he debuted with the Brooklyn Dodgers at Ebbets Field on April 15, 1947, he was a six-time All-Star, Rookie of the Year and won the MVP in 1949. In his tenth and final season, he hit .275 with 10 home runs and 43 RBIs in 117 games. Jackie Robinson retired with a career .311 bating average, 947 runs scored and 197 stolen bases, the most memorable his steal of home in the first inning in game one of the 1955 World Series against the New York Yankees who had beaten the Brooklyn Dodgers the past five World Series they had played against one another (1941, 1947, 1949, 1952, 1953).                                                                                                      
#13122: NEWS
1956-12-18, , 5 min.
Richard Nixon, Dwight Eisenhower, Jawaharlal Nehru

Highlights: India's Prime Minister or India, Jawaharlal Nehru says the danger of war is not past, visits President Eisenhower in Washington, Vice-President Nixon on the way to Austria to inspect Hungarian refugee problem, Russia tries to ease Poland problem, freighters collide near Staten Island, France calls for a summit conference, Swiss expel Hungarian spies.                                                   
#13122A: NEWS WITH BILL RIPPEY
1956-12-26, , 04 min.
Bill Rippey

Highlights: Bomb scares continue in New York City, the police seek "mad bomber," Eisenhower boosts Hungarian refugee numbers to the United States, above quotas, UN agreement reached in Suez Canal clearance. bus desegregation called off in Alabama.                          
#13122B: TEX AND JINX RADIO SHOW, THE
1956-12-26, WRCA, 00 min.
Joe Louis, Jinx Falkenburg, Tex McCrary, John Foster Dulles

Guest Joe Louis ex-heavyweight champion, talks about his song, "He Can Run, But He Can't Hide," sung by Billy Eckstine. Louis also recalls his past ring career and his tax problems with the United States Government, Jinx comments on the future of color television. John Foster Dulles, Time Magazine's Man Of The Year for 1954.                                       
#13122C: BERT AND HARRY PIELS COMMERCIAL
1956-12-26, , 1 min.
Bob and Ray, Bob Elliott, Ray Goulding

Commercial for Piels Beer with Bert and Harry Piels.                                                   
#13123: TEX AND JINX SHOW, THE
1956-12-28, WRCA, 60 min.
Dag Hammarskjold, Mickey Mantle, Grace Kelly, Nikita Khrushchev, Jinx Falkenburg, Adlai Stevenson, Richard Nixon, Martin Luther King, Tex McCrary, John Foster Dulles, Imre Nagy, Jawaharlal Nehru, Prince Rainier, John Burns, Ben Gurian, Josip Tito, Gamal Nasser

Broadcast from "Peacock Alley at the Waldorf Astoria" from the NBC studios in New York City, The MAN OF THE YEAR show, which originated in 1947 by Time Magazine. 

Highlights: "Man Of The Year" search for 1956, a review of 1956 personalities featuring the voices of Imre Nagy of Hungary, Nikita Khrushchev, General Josip Tito, Gamal Nassar, Ben Gurian, Dag  Hammarskjold, Jawaharlal Nehru, General John Burns (commander of the UN police force in Egypt), Prince Rainier of Monaco, Grace Kelly, Mickey Mantle, Dr. Martin Luther King, Adlai Stevenson, John Foster Dulles, Richard Nixon. Jinx Falkenburg previews color television for 1957 and its future, and Stereophonic Sound. 
Man of the year is President Dwight D. Eisenhower. We hear excerpts from his June 12, 1945 speech in London, 1952 & 1956 acceptance speech at Republican convention, and comments he made related to Anglo-French-Israel invasion.                                                     
#13124: FLEETWOOD RADIO SHOW WITH HARRY FLEETWOOD
1956-12-28, WNBC, 1 min.
Harry Fleetwood

Harry Fleetwood was a nighttime radio disc jockey who played classical music on WNBC radio in New York City.                                                 
#13125: NEWS, THE
1956-12-28, , 5 min.
James Curley

Highlights: fake bombs planted in New York City, The police try to track down the real "Mad Bomber," Fires in the Malibu Beach area of California, a negro woman is wounded by shots fired while riding a bus in Montgomery, Alabama, update on bus segregation, ex-gov Curley of Massachusetts seriously ill.                                                     
#13126: CBS SPECIAL: THE NEW FRONTIERS OF SCIENCE
1956-12-30, WCBS, 24 min.
Douglas Edwards, Robert Trout, Will Rogers, Ned Calmer, Jonas Salk, Albert Sabin, Lawrence Snyder

CBS Special: The New Frontiers Of Science.

Highlights include electron computers, new drugs to curtail diseases, new heart surgery techniques, (heart-lung machine),
radioisotopes used in the study of photosynthesis, Dr. Jonas Salk polio vaccine in full production, new live virus vaccine related by Dr. Sabin, drugs for the treatment of mental illness, Dr.Lawrence Snyder President of AAS, speaks on behalf of science. Also commentary from Robert Trout, Ned Calmer, and Douglas Edwards.  

Will Rogers is the host. 

                                   
#13127: BIG NEWS OF 1956, THE
1956-12-30, CBS, 46 min.
Charles Collingwood, Grace Kelly, Nikita Khrushchev, Don Larsen, Joe Smith, John F. Kennedy, Richard Nixon, Dwight Eisenhower, Estes Kefauver, Prince Rainier, John Kasper

CBS NEWS: Top News Stories Of 1956

Highlights: PresidentEisenhower health problems, announced candidacy at Democratic Convention, Vice Presidential battle between Senator John F. Kennedy and Senator Estes Kefauver,
Republican Convention, nomination, Presidential campaign topics, 
Eisenhower and Nixon were expected to be nominated by acclamation when a lone delegate voted for a fictitious candidate named "Joe Smith." The sinking of the Andrea Doria,
700 people die in weekend automobile accidents, two airlines collide over Grand Canyon Arizona, 128 die, the problem of overcrowded skies, Grace Kelly marries Prince Rainier of Monaco, racial problems in the South in Clinton, Tennessee, huge school desegregation riots, interviews with negroes and whites, including John Kasper, violent segregationist and member of the Klu Klux Klan, Don Larsen's perfect World Series game, Khruschev denounces Stalin cult, Polish riots, Hungarian revolution, Cyprus revolt against British occupation, Middle East crisis, Anglo-French, Israeli-Eygptian war.

Host: Charles Collingwood.                                                                            
#13128: YEARS OF CRISES: 1956
1956-12-30, CBS, 24 min.
Howard K. Smith, Robert Pierpoint, Daniel Schorr, Eric Sevareid, David Schoenbrun, Edward R. Murrow, Richard C. Hottelet, Winston Burdett

Newsmen Howard K. Smith, Richard C. Hottelet, Robert Pierpoint, Eric Sevareid, Winston Burdett, Daniel Schorr, and David Schoenbrun comment on the top news stories of 1956, particularly the Middle East and communism. 

Edward R. Murrow is the moderator.                                      
#13129: GUY LOMBARDO NEW YEAR'S EVE PARTY AT THE WALDORF ASTORIA, THE
1956-12-31, CBS, 10 min.
Guy Lombardo, Robert Trout

Beginning in 1929, a New Year's Eve Tradition...Guy Lombardo & his Royal Canadians. Guy Lombardo was best known to TV audiences for his annual New Year's Eve telecasts. His brothers Carmen (the band's musical director), Victor, & Lebert were all members of the orchestra. Guy, the eldest, was designated the leader. For most of his years in television, Guy Lombardo represented nostalgia for the '30s and '40s. At midnight the traditional welcoming in of the New Year at Times Square is presented. Jack Lescoulie brings in the New Year at Times Square.   

The best-known New Year's Eve shows on radio and then television was hosted by bandleader Guy Lombardo, who hosted 21 consecutive New Year's Eve shows from 1956 to 1976 on CBS, and for a time in syndication. Lombardo's first radio broadcast on New Year's Eve was heard on December 31, 1928 over CBS Radio, and for a time he even split hosting duties by broadcasting on CBS Radio before 12 Midnight EST and on NBC Radio after Midnight. Lombardo would host 48 straight New Year's Eve broadcasts until his death in 1977, and famously performed "Auld Lang Syne" by his Royal Canadians as the clock struck 12 Midnight, ushering in the start of a New Year. 

Once the Lombardo orchestra began their annual television shows, there would be a live segment from Times Square, which was (and still is) the focal point of the nation's largest New Year's celebration. In the early years of Lombardo's television specials, Robert Trout reported on and counted down to Midnight in New York's Times Square; but for most of Lombardo's years on television, another legendary newsman, Ben Grauer, had the honor. (Grauer, by the way, also reported from Times Square for NBC Radio on celebrations following the surrender of Japan on August 14, 1945.

The first New Year's Eve special on television was broadcast on December 31, 1941 on WNBT New York, and consisted of entertainment broadcast from the Rainbow Room, atop the RCA Building in New York's Rockefeller Center.[3]

Due to World War II, there would be no more New Year's Eve specials on television until December 31, 1945. WNBT produced a remote broadcast of festivities in Times Square. While NBC had begun to feed programs to WRGB is the Albany area and WPTZ in Philadelphia, information is unavailable as to whether either or both of these stations broadcast the program, or if it was seen just locally in New York.[4]

Unless New Year's Eve fell on a weekend, NBC would carry a special New Year's version of "The Tonight Show" each year beginning in 1954, including coverage of the arrival of the New Year in Times Square.

Dick Clark himself had actually emceed one New Year's Eve TV special prior to 1972; on December 31, 1959, he emceed a 90-minute New Year's special on ABC. One of the guests was Frankie Avalon. But it would be the last time Clark would do a New Year's Eve television special for the next thirteen years.

By the 1970s, Lombardo's big band music skewed to an older generation, so Dick Clark started his telecast in 1972 to compete.  

New Year's Eve celebration, ushering in 1957 with bandleader Guy Lombardo. Robert Trout reports from Times Square.                                
#13130: CBS NEWS WITH DOUGLAS EDWARDS, THE
1957-01-01, WCBS, 6 min.
Douglas Edwards, Richard Nixon, Dwight Eisenhower

Highlights: President Eisenhower meeting in the White House, He wants the authority to use military might against communism or "Ike Doctrine," Nixon urges more Hungarian refugees to enter the USA, Hungarian refugees arrive in the United States, a report on the day's Bowl games, a report on the latest segregation issues.                                                    
#13131: PABTS BLUE RIBBON BOUTS: MIDDLEWEIGHT BOXING CHAMPIONSHIP, THE
1957-01-02, , 12 min.
Les Keiter, Gene Fullmer, Jack Drees, Sugar Ray Robinson, Ruby Goldstein, Steve Ellis, Johnny Addie, Carmen Basillio, Tony Anthony, Gaspar Orgega, Tiger Jones

Radio broadcast opens with Jack Drees inviting audience to stay tuned to a great Middleweight Championship Boxing Match from Madison Square Garden in New York. 1,700 fans attend.
Introductions by ring announcer, Johnny Addie is heard. Fighters in attendance enter the ring to applause. They include, Carmen Basillio, Tony Anthony, Gaspar Ortega, and Tiger Jones.
Addie explains rules at center of the ring to Robinson and Fullmer.

NOTE:
Steve Ellis gives the blow-by-blow report from ringside. The referee is Ruby Goldstein.

Only the fifteenth round is recorded of this Middleweight Championship of the world between Sugar Ray Robinson and Gene Fullmer. Steve Ellis gives the blow-by-blow report from ringside. The referee is Ruby Goldstein.
The 15th round is heard (a few edits exist in this final round recording, but not significant). 
Gene Fullmer wins by decision, announced by Johnny Addie. 

Interviews with Robinson and Goldstein occur after the fight. 

NOTE 2:
Interestingly, this fight was blacked out in New York. No television broadcasting was permitted. It did air on Connecticut TV Channel 8 WNHC out of New Haven. From New York at 10pm SPORTS PARADE aired with Les Keiter kept viewers posted with spot reports interspersed with general sports films.
However, ABC channel 7 in New York did allow viewers to see the final decision after the end of the 15th round. 

NOTE 3:
This match was originally scheduled to occur on  December 12, 1956, but was postponed.                                                  
#13132: CBS NEWS WITH RON COCHRAN, THE
1957-01-05, WCBS, 8 min.
Elvis Presley, Ron Cochran, Dwight Eisenhower, Marie McDonald

Highlights: "Eisenhower Doctrine" to curb Middle East aggression, the US to give military aid to countries if so desired, Russians denounce Eisenhower speech and policy, actress Marie McDonald relates kidnapping incident, Elvis Presley gets a pre-induction exam                         
#13133: PIELS BEER COMMERCIAL
1957-01-05, , 1 min.
Bob Elliott, Ray Goulding

A Piels Beer commercial with Bert and Harry Piels                        
#13134: LATE SHOW, THE
1957-01-05, WCBS, 1 min.
Announcer

February 26, 1951-April 26, 1968

"The Late Show" premiered on WCBS TV New York on Feb. 26, 1951 "The Late Late Show" followed not long after, as did "The Early Show." As its run accumulated, WCBS would commemorate its  anniversary the week of Feb. 26 in different ways. On Feb. 26, 1963, for example, Ch. 2 celebrated "The Late Show's 4,327th broadcast...12th anniversary by inaugurating an extended broadcast day that ended after 5 A.M.

The last time the moniker "The Late Show" was broadcast on WCBS television it was April 26, 1968 (WOLF LARSEN (1958). The series lasted 17 years and two months, totaling 6,189 Movie broadcasts. Films still ran in the 11:30 pm time slot afterward but without the "Late Show" opening. 

The Late Show opening prior to the movie " Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo."                                                                        
#34: LATE SHOW, THE
1960-07-06, WCBS, 1 min.
Humphrey Bogart, John Huston, Leroy Anderson, Percy Faith, Announcer, Fred C. Dobbs

February 26, 1951-April 26, 1968

"The Late Show" which for years would be New York's top feature film show, premiered on WCBS TV New York on Feb. 26, 1951 "The Late Late Show" followed not long after, as did "The Early Show." As its run accumulated, WCBS would commemorate its  anniversary the week of Feb. 26 in different ways. On Feb. 26, 1963, for example, Ch. 2 celebrated "The Late Show's 4,327th broadcast...12th anniversary by inaugurating an extended broadcast day that ended after 5 A.M., unprecedented for its time.

The standard opening of "The Late Show" had the announcer state the title of the film, its cast and some additional relevant anecdotal piece of information related to the film. The musical opening was "The Syncopated Clock," written by Leroy Anderson and recorded by Percy Faith in 1951 (released by Columbia Records). The catchy melody was noticed by the producers of the new WCBS-TV program "The Late Show," that was to be the station's first venture into late night television. Faith's rendition was chosen as the theme music for The Late Show by WCBS and several other CBS owned-and-operated stations around the country, which helped Anderson's composition become a tune that many Americans could readily hum or whistle, even if few knew the name of its composer. WCBS would also use the Faith recording to introduce a weekday afternoon movie (The Early Show) and a later-night movie offering, The Late Late Show.

In 2006 a shortened version of The Syncopated Clock theme music would become the standard opening of the Archival Television Audio, Inc. archived collection...musical intro preceding a specific mastered TV Audio Air Check, which had been processed and mastered from the original off the air recording.  


The last time the moniker "The Late Show" was broadcast on WCBS television, in New York, was April 26, 1968 (WOLF LARSEN (1958). The series lasted 17 years and two months, totaling 6,189 Movie broadcasts. Films still ran in the 11:30pm time slot afterwards, but without the "Late Show" opening. During the years to follow, thru the 1970's, other facsimile Late Show openings were created, a secondary version of the original series. 

"The Syncopated Clock" instrumental standard opening is heard. The announcer introduces "Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo."                                                                                     
#13135: ED SULLIVAN SHOW (TOAST OF THE TOWN)
1957-01-06, CBS, 15 min.
Jackie Robinson, Ed Sullivan, Elvis Presley, Sugar Ray Robinson

           June 20, 1948 - May 30, 1971

ED SULLIVAN SHOW, THE, (TOAST OF THE TOWN)
Television's longest running variety series. Originally, titled, TOAST OF THE TOWN, the name of the series changed on September 18, 1955 to THE ED SULLIVAN SHOW. Most remembered for introducing many stand-up comedians, and musical acts, including The Rolling Stones, Elvis Presley, The Beatles. 

 Most of the 1,087 broadcasts, encompassing 10,000 performers, have been archived. The major exceptions are the first half year of shows circa 1948 of which a few kinescope excerpts survive.
 
The ED SULLIVAN SHOW was a spectacular show-case that for twenty-three years entertained the American family. In its prime, more than thirty million viewers, young and old, tuned in at the same time to view popular culture.   

On this show, Ed Sullivan congratulates Brooklyn Dodger Jackie Robinson on his retirement from baseball, other guests include Sugar Ray Robinson, and Elvis Presley who sings,
"Hound Dog," (complete)
"Love Me Tender," (partial)
"Heartbreak Hotel," (partial)

Elvis Presley thanks all of his fans and introduces his biggest record, 
"Don't Be Cruel," (complete),
"Too Much," (partial)
"In My Arms To Take." (partial)                                              
#13135A: NBC NEWS WITH KENNETH BANGHART, THE
1957-01-09, WNBC, 00 min.
Dwight Eisenhower, John Foster Dulles, Kenneth Banghart, Anthony Eden

Highlights: Anthony Eden resigns as Prime Minister as a result of the Egyptian fiasco, Eisenhower Middle East doctrine, Pressure applied for Secretary of State Dulles to be fired, he is accused of indecision, Britain no longer considered a first-rate power, slipped to the second rank as the result of Middle East humiliation.            
#13136: JACKIE GLEASON SHOW, THE
1957-01-12, WCBS, 6 min.
Jackie Gleason, Eddie Cantor, Edward R. Murrow

September 20, 1952-June 22, 1957; October 3, 1958-January 2 1959; February 3 1961-March 24, 1961; September 1962-September 12, 1970

After the 1954-1955 season (one hour live broadcasts), Jackie Gleason produced a series of 39 filmed half-hour episodes of "The Honeymooners" which was syndicated (1955-1956). For the following 1956-1957 season, the Jackie Gleason Show returned to a live one-hour variety format with a Honeymooners sketch included in many of its broadcasts. After this season, The Honeymooners sketches would not be revived until the 1966-1967 season of The Jackie Gleason Show.    

Eddie Cantor is honored on his 65th birthday. 
Cantor sings "Waiting For The Robert E. Lee."

Guests: Eddie Cantor, and Edward R.Murrow.                                                                                       
#6973: AT SIXTY FIVE
1957-01-12, CBS, 54 min.
George Jessel, Eddie Fisher, Edward R. Murrow, Eddie Cantor, George Burns, Burt Lancaster, Gracie Allen, Lucille Ball, Desi Arnaz, Connie Russel, Milton Ager, Harry Akst, Jimmy Mchugh, Marilyn Cantor

A special one hour salute to Eddie Cantor celebrating his 65th birthday. On hand to salute him in this variety program are Edward R. Murrow, Burt Lancaster, Connie Russel, George Jessel, George Burns, Gracie Allen, Eddie Fisher, Lucille Ball, Desi Arnay, Milton Ager, Jimmy McHugh, and Cantor's daughter, Marilyn Cantor. Eddie Cantor wrote the script for the show, pre-empting The Jackie Gleason Show.                                                                                                                     
#13136A: HY GARDNER
1957-01-14, WRCA, 2 min.
Steve Allen, Hy Gardner, Ed Sullivan, Ingrid Bergman, Elsa Maxwell, Marie McDonald, King Farouk, Frank Pace, John L. Sullivan, Louis Arthur Johnson

    
HY GARDNER - Mon-Fri, weekdays, WRCA CH. 4 New York City 11:15-11:25pm, 11:20-11:30pm, 11:15-11:30pm September 10, 1956-January 25, 1957  

Preceding TONITE! Hy Gardner had a ten minute news/gossip series on WNBC TV. On this broadcast the news of the day included:

-Los Angeles police are expected to announce a solution to the Marie McDonald "who done it" case. Hy feels that the actress was kidnapped and that the incident was not a hoax.

-The board of directors for Lowe's Inc. include the former secretary of defense Louis Johnson, former secretary of the army Frank Pace, and former secretary of the navy, John Sullivan. Hy thinks that MGM must be getting ready to launch a new cycle of war movies.

-King Farouk is suing Elsa Maxwell for material she wrote about the former King of Egypt in her new book.

-Ironically, Ed Sullivan, publicity man, is promoting for Steve Allen Ingrid Bergman's next Sunday's appearance on The Steve Allen Show.       
#9499: TRIBUTE TO HUMPHREY BOGART
1957-01-16, NBC, 28 min.
W.C. Fields, Greta Garbo, .Humphrey Bogart, George Fisher, John Barrymoore, John Dekker, Charles Butterworth, Mark Hellinger, Mike Romenoff

  From Hollywood NBC Radio pays tribute to Humphrey Bogart on the eve of his funeral, scheduled for the next day at noon.
 
Hosted by Bogart's long time friend, George Fisher who plays  excerpts of telephone recorded conversations he had with Bogart over the years. Heard, is a 1951 conversation of Bogart discussing the making of AFRICAN QUEEN...his relationship with  co-star Katherine Hepburn...a 1952 conversation discussing the  birth of his daughter, Leslie, the day before...a 1953 phone conversation about planning to do a fourth film with his wife Lauren Bacall...reminisces about his friendships with John Barrymoore, W.C. Fields, John Huston, John Dekker, Charles Butterworth, Mark Hellinger, Greta Garbo and Mike 
Romenoff. 

Other conversation touches on Bogart's love of Scotch and his own reputation of being a "character."

John Huston, who directed Bogart in five motion pictures, and life long friend, gives his own personal tribute to his pal "Boggie." He will be giving the eulogy at Humphrey Bogart's funeral tomorrow, January 17, 1957.       
#13137: DWIGHT EISENHOWER INAUGURATION SPEECH, THE
1957-01-20, , min.
Dwight Eisenhower

Inauguration speech of President Dwight Eisenhower.                                        
#6967B: TONIGHT! STARRING STEVE ALLEN
1957-01-23, WRCA, 6 min.
Steve Allen, Skitch Henderson, Gene Rayburn, Pat Kirby

 September 27, 1954 - January 25, 1957

The first host of THE TONIGHT SHOW, which was then titled TONIGHT!, Steve Allen began his broadcast career as a disc jockey. On July 27, 1953 Steve Allen began hosting a local show over WRCA-TV which ran from 11:20 P.M. to Midnight , Mondays through Fridays, sponsored by Knickerbocker Beer, developed by station executive Ted Cott to lure a potential sponsor, Rupert Breweries, away from a late-night show on New York's Channel 7 (TALK OF THE TOWN), hosted by Louis Nye, who would later be featured on Steve Allen's Sunday Night Variety Show.  

After a successful fourteen-month local run, THE STEVE ALLEN SHOW became a network show. Beginning September 27, 1954, the show retitled TONIGHT!, and expanded to 105 minutes from 40 minutes. 
 
NOTE: Sound of this Television Audio Air Check is PRISTINE. A rare return to an early TONIGHT! STARRING STEVE ALLEN broadcast when Late Night Television was so informal and relaxed with open ended time dedicated to a person, topic, music, or just impromptu  comedy.  
The basic format of The Tonight! Show was established during Allen's tenure: an opening monologue, a segment involving the studio audience (through interviews or games such as "Stump the Band"), and a simple set (a desk and chair for the host, a couch for the guests), all trademarks of the Allen era. Allen inaugurated the out-of-town broadcast (the first one was done from Miami), the one guest show (Carl Sandburg was the first solo guest), and the one topic show (entire programs devoted to such subjects as narcotics, civil rights, and black music). Allen also established the practice of paying his guests only "scale," the minimum fee required by union-network contract (this practice led to a highly publicized  feud between Steve Allen and Ed Sullivan and later between Jack Paar and Ed Sullivan, as Sullivan paid top dollar for his guests). Though Allen's Tonight! show closely resembled the shows of his successors, Jack Paar and Johnny Carson, it was more a musical show; Allen himself was an accomplished musician and composer (he wrote his theme, "This Could Be The Start of Something Big"), and he employed a nucleus of musical regulars on his show. In addition to announcer – sidekick Gene Rayburn, the show featured singers Steve Lawrence (who was only seventeen when he began singing on Allen's local show), Eydie Gormé (who subsequently married Steve Lawrence), Andy Williams (who later hosted several series of his own), and Pat Marshall (who was succeeded by Pat Kirby).  Skitch Henderson led the Orchestra.                                                                              
#6967A: TONIGHT! STARRING STEVE ALLEN
1957-01-24, WRCA, 40 min.
Steve Allen

 September 27, 1954 - January 25, 1957

This next to last TONIGHT! STARRING STEVE ALLEN was devoted to the culture of Cuba. Many Cuban personalities perform on the show. 

The first host of THE TONIGHT SHOW, which was then titled TONIGHT!, Steve Allen began his broadcast career as a disc jockey. On July 27, 1953 Steve Allen began hosting a local show over WRCA-TV which ran from 11:20 P.M. to Midnight , Mondays through Fridays, sponsored by Knickerbocker Beer, developed by station executive Ted Cott to lure a potential sponsor, Rupert Breweries, away from a late-night show on New York's Channel 7 (TALK OF THE TOWN), hosted by Louis Nye, who would later be featured on Steve Allen's Sunday Night Variety Show.  

After a successful fourteen-month local run, THE STEVE ALLEN SHOW became a network show. Beginning September 27, 1954, the show retitled TONIGHT!, and expanded to 105 minutes from 40 minutes. 
 
NOTE: Sound of this Television Audio Air Check is PRISTINE. A rare return to an early TONIGHT! STARRING STEVE ALLEN broadcast when Late Night Television was so informal and relaxed with open ended time dedicated to a person, topic, music, or just impromptu  comedy.  
The basic format of The Tonight! Show was established during Allen's tenure: an opening monologue, a segment involving the studio audience (through interviews or games such as "Stump the Band"), and a simple set (a desk and chair for the host, a couch for the guests), all trademarks of the Allen era. Allen inaugurated the out-of-town broadcast (the first one was done from Miami), the one guest show (Carl Sandburg was the first solo guest), and the one topic show (entire programs devoted to such subjects as narcotics, civil rights, and black music). Allen also established the practice of paying his guests only "scale," the minimum fee required by union-network contract (this practice led to a highly publicized  feud between Steve Allen and Ed Sullivan and later between Jack Paar and Ed Sullivan, as Sullivan paid top dollar for his guests). Though Allen's Tonight! show closely resembled the shows of his successors, Jack Paar and Johnny Carson, it was more a musical show; Allen himself was an accomplished musician and composer (he wrote his theme, "This Could Be The Start of Something Big"), and he employed a nucleus of musical regulars on his show. In addition to announcer – sidekick Gene Rayburn, the show featured singers Steve Lawrence (who was only seventeen when he began singing on Allen's local show), Eydie Gormé (who subsequently married Steve Lawrence), Andy Williams (who later hosted several series of his own), and Pat Marshall (who was succeeded by Pat Kirby).  Skitch Henderson led the Orchestra.                                                                 
#6967: TONIGHT! STARRING STEVE ALLEN
1957-01-25, WRCA, 87 min.
Steve Allen, Hy Gardner, Gene Krupa, Audrey Meadows, Milt Kamen, Jack Lescoulie, Lionel Hampton, Buddy Hackett, Bob Considine, Jayne Meadows, Peter Lawford, Irwin Corey, George Gobel, Ray McKinley, Doc Severinsen, Earl Wilson, Tina Louise, Micki Marlo, John Crosby, Sammy Davis, Sally Powers, Maggie Pierce, Dorothy Miller, Joe Interleggi, Vic Marcell, Jim Moran, Pat Marshall, Mrs. Sterling, Pat Kirby, Edie Gorme, Gene Raymond, Miki Marlo, Sol Yagid

September 27, 1954 - January 25, 1957. This evenings telecast is the final TONIGHT! show starring Steve Allen. A farewell party is staged. All the regular singers are featured in musical numbers and Steve uses some of the 'gimmicks which found great popularity on show during the 2 1/2 years on air, including the big salami, and goo goo dolls. Steve speaks briefly to some of the men on the new "Tonight" show which starts next week. They include Jack Lescoulie, Earl Wilson, Hy Gardner, & Bob Considine. 

The basic format of The Tonight! Show was established during Allen's tenure: an opening monologue, a segment involving the studio audience (through interviews or games such as "Stump the Band"), and a simple set (a desk and chair for the host, a couch for the guests), all trademarks of the Allen era. Allen inaugurated the out-of-town broadcast (the first one was done from Miami), the one guest show (Carl Sandburg was the first solo guest), and the one topic show (entire programs devoted to such subjects as narcotics, civil rights, and black music). Allen also established the practice of paying his guests only "scale," the minimum fee required by union-network contract (this practice led to a highly publicized  feud between Steve Allen and Ed Sullivan and later between Jack Paar and Ed Sullivan, as Sullivan paid top dollar for his guests). Though Allen's Tonight! show closely resembled the shows of his successors, Jack Paar and Johnny Carson, it was more a musical show; Allen himself was an accomplished musician and composer (he wrote his theme, "This Could Be The Start of Something Big"), and he employed a nucleus of musical regulars on his show. In addition to announcer – sidekick Gene Rayburn, the show featured singers Steve Lawrence (who was only seventeen when he began singing on Allen's local show), Eydie Gormé (who subsequently married Steve Lawrence), Andy Williams (who later hosted several series of his own), and Pat Marshall (who was succeeded by Pat Kirby).  Skitch Henderson led the Orchestra.                                                    
#5895: RUGGLES OF RED GAP
1957-02-03, WNBC, 80 min.
Jane Powell, Paul Lynde, Hal Linden, Peter Lawford, Imogene Coca, David Wayne, Michael Redgrave, Joan Holloway, The Buster Davis Choir

Based on the 1915 book by Harry Leon Wilson. A cattleman on a trip to Europe, wins a stuffy English valet in a poker game whose escapades in adjusting to life in America are challenged. Garry Moore introduces the program. Slight variations in sound quality. No end credits. This is a lost television broadcast.
#GR3: MATINEE THEATER: "THE OTHERS"
1957-02-15, WNBC, min.
John Conte, Phil Gries, Gary Rutkowski, Tommy Kirk, Geoffrey Toone, Sarah Churchill, Karen Sue Trent

    October 31, 1955 - June 13, 1958

A governess battles to save two children from an evil supernatural force.

This peerless COMPLETE AUDIO AIR CHECK broadcast  of THE OTHERS was restored by Phil Gries from an original 1/4" reel to reel audio tape discovered and obtained by archivist scholar Gary Rutkowski (www.savetv.tv).

Matinee Theater  was an American anthology series that aired on NBC during the Golden Age of Television, from October 31, 1955,[ to June 27, 1958 (including last two weeks of re-runs).
 
The series was broadcast on NBC television daily from 3 p.m. to 4 p.m. Eastern Time, was usually broadcast LIVE and most of the time in color. Its live dramas were presented with minimal sets and costumes. During its three-year series run there were 7000 different performers employed, and hundreds of talented writers and directors who navigated its peerless television run, using 4,200 sets, 210,000 props, and 15,000 costumes.
 
Host for this series was John Conti.

When it was broadcast, Matinee Theater was the most heavily promoted regularly scheduled daytime program on U.S. television, part of the network's effort to "provide quality 'adult' entertainment" in daytime programming. 
 
The series ended in 1958 due to its high budget, much higher than any other daytime program in television. A few of the later episodes were preserved on color film for later rerun syndication under different titles.

Almost all of the 590 original and 81 re-run episodes broadcast have been wiped, destroyed, or are not known to exist any longer in any broadcast form (audio or kinescope, or video).

UCLA Film & TV has 20 different kinescopes in their archive, most not accessible. 

The Library of Congress has only TWO kinescopes in their archive, each on separate negative audio tracks, and separate 16mm Negative Kinescopes. However in 1986 when NBC TV donated 18,600 of their extant kinescopes (1948-1975) to the LOC, their was notated at that time SEVEN separate kinescopes (separate 16mm films and corresponding Negative Optical Sound tracks), for the broadcast dates, Oct. 31, 1955, Nov. 28, 1955, Nov. 29, 1955, Dec. 20, 1955, April 20, 1956, May 3, 1956 & Dec. 10, 1956. 

The Paley Center for Media has THREE composite kinescopes in their archive. 

*The following FOUR television audio air checks are extant in the Archival Television Audio, Inc. collection, archived on ¼” reel to reel audio tape originally used to record these programs off the air, direct line, resulting in excellent playback sound, at the time of their original broadcast. 

*All FOUR titles extant in the ATA archive are not included in the above three major USA media archives.

6 Nov. 1956
ATA#GR1 The Tell-Tale Heart – November 6, 1956

In this classic Edgar Allan Poe story, a man commits a murder, but afterward the victim's beating heart torments the murderer's mind.


5 Feb. 1957
ATA#GR2 Frankenstein – February 5, 1957 

An obsessed scientist assembles a living being from parts of exhumed corpses.


15 Feb. 1957
ATA#GR3 The Others – February 15, 1957
 7.8 (21)
 
A governess battles to save two children from an evil supernatural force.

13 Dec. 1956
ATA#GR4 Captain Brassbound's Conversion – December 13, 1957

Captain Brassbound, a vindictive sea captain, swears revenge on a visiting Englishman whom he blames for his mother's death.

*The scripts of the MATINEE THEATER series' later episodes are archived at the University of California, Los Angeles.
                                                                                                    
#13138: BOB HOPE SPECIALS, THE
1957-03-10, NBC, min.
Bob Hope

From 1950 tho 1996 Bob Hope did 273 SPECIALS for NBC TV.

The opening monologue is heard.                        
#13139: TWENTY-ONE
1957-03-11, NBC, min.
Jack Barry, Charles Van Doren, Vivian Nearing

September 12th,1956-October, 16th 1958 

This quiz show was NBC's answer to the popular CBS quiz the $64,000 question and was hosted by series co-creator Jack Barry. Contestant Charles Van Doren proved to be the most popular of all the show's contestants although Elfreda Von Nardroff went home with the most money after twenty-one appearances. The two contestants were placed in isolation booths where they were asked a series of questions. Van Doren would often make pained facial expressions in his booth when asked a question he was struggling with. It was discovered later that Van Doren had been given some of the answers. Another contestant, Herbert Stempel blew the whistle on the show accusing the program of giving some of the answers to the contestants. In October 1958 the show was removed from the air as the quiz show scandal was becoming more widely-known.

In this episode, Charles Van Doren loses to Vivian Nearing. Van Doren's total winnings were $129,000. Host Jack Barry congratulates Van Doren as "a credit to the youth of America."
Due to the scandal, creator Jack Barry did not work again on national television for a decade.
                                                                                         
#13140: CBS NEWS WITH RON COCHRAN, THE
1957-03-11, CBS, 6 min.
Ron Cochran, David Beck, Admiral Richard Byrd

Highlights: Admiral Richard Byrd, explorer, dies, Egypt defies the UN on the Gaza Strip, a new aviation speed record by a 707 jet across the United States is set at three hours and 45 minutes, David Beck will appear as a witness in the Senate Labor Rackets Committee, news of the first outdoor phone booth.                         
#5894: EILEEN
1957-03-14, WNBC, 54 min.
Gordon MacRae, Patricia Morison, Wendy Martin, John Paul Keast, Laurie Carroll, James Lydon

Presented on "LUX VIDEO THEATRE." The Victor Herbert-Henry Blossom comic opera about an Irish rebel who falls in love with a beautiful English girl.
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